ANSELMA HARTLEY



Anselma Hartley, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Psychology
Wake Forest University
1834 Wake Forest Road
Winston-Salem, NC 27109
hartleag@wfu.edu

resume // cv

My research lies at the intersection of social cognition and personality assessment. Broadly, I am interested in fundamental questions of social perception: How do we naturally perceive and form evaluations of personality? What are the most important situational and personality factors that influence and shape our evaluations? What is the best way to capture and measure personality that is most congruent with how people informally think about personality? I use both field and experimental methods to answer these questions. For more information about my current and past work, navigate to Research.

Currently, I work as a postdoctoral research associate on The Beacon Project at Wake Forest University. My colleagues and I study how people perceive morality in others and themselves, and how moral character (e.g., honesty, empathy) varies across situations and develops over time. I received my Ph.D. in psychology from Brown University (2013), where I worked with Jack Wright. My dissertation was entitled, "Reconceptualizing the Perception and Assessment of Personality Change." Prior to Brown, I completed my M.A. at Connecticut College (2008), where I studied the assessment of child psychopathology and behavior change. At Connecticut College, I began work as a research assistant on the Wediko Transitions Project, a multi-year study of behavior change. Upon graduation from Connecticut College, I received the Otello Desiderato Award for the student with most promise in doctoral studies. Before attending Connecticut College, I earned my B.A. in psychology from SUNY Stony Brook.

I am interested in interdisciplinary projects that span the areas of social cognition, personality processes, quantitative analyses, user experience, and psychometrics. Please feel free to contact me regarding freelance quantitative, teaching, or survey work.